Is college really worth it?

Junior+Colby+Ringstaff+holding+a+DCC+pennant
Back to Article
Back to Article

Is college really worth it?

Junior Colby Ringstaff holding a DCC pennant

Junior Colby Ringstaff holding a DCC pennant

Junior Colby Ringstaff holding a DCC pennant

Junior Colby Ringstaff holding a DCC pennant

Daniella Espinoza, Editor-in-Chief

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






As many students reach their senior year in high school  they are faced with one of the biggest decisions in their lives. Whether or not they will be furthering their education. Although the traditional route is to go to a four year university, people are creating their own paths every  day. Growing up, society tells high school students that the only way to have a prosperous life is to have a higher education, but what about those who choose not to go to college? Can they not afford it? Or is it just not something they want to partake in? 

Tunstall alumnus Christian Mclaughlin says that “When you’re growing up in a house of six there’s really no point in going to college, it was too big of an expense.” Although you may be asking “Why not get a student loan?” Many students don’t feel like going into debt at such an early age, junior Caleb Allmond says, “I don’t want to have to pay someone back for the rest of my life.”

Ms. Kat Founce, the college advisor at THS, says that, “the highest motivation for not going to college after high school is the want for immediate money after graduating; however, in the long run those with a college degree earn thousands more. Other reasons for students not wanting to go to college are them not being able to see themselves there and the expense of attending college.” 

College is often one of the stepping stones into adulthood, and there’s a major social aspect. Opposed to high school where you are still treated like a child, the “college experience” provides you with independence away from your parents, a transition into becoming a self-sufficient adult, and freedom to make mistakes and learn from them. Not only are you provided with valuable life lessons but expanding one’s academic horizons is often seeked out upon in the job world.

Although not going to college and making minimum wage may seem like a lot of money right now, in just four years your prior classmates may be making double the amount you make. So the real question is, would you rather make money fast or money that will last?

Print Friendly, PDF & Email